Killed for naught | Inquirer Opinion

Killed for naught

05:01 AM December 04, 2017

Josephine Anne Lapira, a 22-year-old student of the University of the Philippines Manila, a scholar and a dreamer. She was one of the five women who died in a clash between guerrillas and the military in Nasugbu, Batangas. She wanted to be a medical doctor but went on the wrong path.

Did she know what she was really fighting for? She could have shown her grievances in so many other ways without violence and without harming anyone.

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There was an article saying that this woman is a hero. How could she be? Because she was fighting for her principles and advocacies? No, she’s not a hero and she couldn’t be one. She allowed herself to be one of those people who fought for the wrong principles. Heroes don’t die for erroneous ideologies
but they die for what is good for everyone.

The youth are the center of recruitment of the New People’s Army, using Gabriela, Anak-pawis and the Kabataan party list as among their “masks.”

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The youth should be highly discouraged from joining such groups. They should think about their future and consider their families. They should not allow terrorists to fool them. They shouldn’t be victims of the wrong ideologies and be blinded by fake promises, nor allow the guerrillas to waste their lives for nothing.

No one should be like Josephine Anne Lapira who was killed for naught.

MACKIE LORENZO, [email protected]

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TAGS: Inquirer letters, Josephine Anne Lapira, Mackie Lorenzo, NPA attacks, UP Manila
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