Close  
Moments

For adults also

The story is told about a little boy who had the bad habit of sucking his thumb. One day his mother pointed to a very stout man and told her son that the man had such a big stomach because he sucked his thumb. Just then, the boy saw a pregnant woman. He walked up to her and said with a smile: “You don’t know me, but I know what you’ve been doing!”

* * *

ADVERTISEMENT

Today (Sunday) is the feast of the Sto. Niño, in honor of the Child Jesus. In today’s gospel (Mk. 10, 13-16) Jesus reminds us of the greatness of the little ones, “for the Kingdom of God belongs to such as these.” He also tells us to welcome, respect and love them.

* * *

As adults, we can cause the children to come to Jesus, or we can prevent or discourage them from doing so. By our words and examples, may we lead the little ones toward truth, light and life. We ask ourselves today: Am I a stepping stone or a stumbling block to the growth of a child?

* * *

If only adults would take into consideration the welfare and the future of the children, perhaps we would have a better world. The problem with many adults is that they have never outgrown their childhood insecurities and selfishness, and they still treat people as commodities or toys.

* * *

I wonder how our national thieves feel whenever they see poor children who beg and scavenge for food, or who labor and toil at an early age? Do they feel anything at all?

* * *

There should be a venue for children in print, radio and television where they can express their views, comments and suggestions. How about a child columnist in the Inquirer, for instance? Jesus has shown us the example of welcoming and respecting the children. We’ll be amazed at how much children know and perceive life and current events deeply. Yes, let us listen, and let us learn from the children—the innocent, helpless little ones.

ADVERTISEMENT

* * *

The Yellow Boat Project is the story of an adult who heard and really listened to the needs of children from the village of Layag-Layag in Zamboanga City. The children had to swim two kilometers and walk another five kilometers just to go to school. Jay Jaboneta used social media through his Facebook account to raise funds to build a boat for the children to use, so that they would not have to swim across murky waters, carrying their bags on their heads. Generous people started supporting the project, and now the children come to school dry and fresh-looking. The lives of many children have improved because of one adult who really listened and cared. (For more update, go to http:///yellowboat.tumblr.com.)

* * *

The Missionary Sisters, Servants of the Holy Spirit (SSpS) arrived in the Philippines a hundred years ago. On Jan. 2, 1912, four sisters from Europe—Sr. Cyrilla Hullerman, Sr. Hieronyma Schulte-Ladbeck, Sr. Cleta Heuwes and Sr. Cortona Ruther—arrived in Manila on board the SS Persia. They joined their SVD (Society of the Divine Word) brothers who came to Abra three years earlier. From the very start, their whole mission was the education of children, and soon the Holy Ghost School in Tayum, Abra, was founded. The mission grew, and “Holy Ghost Schools” started sprouting all over the Philippines, the most prominent of which is the College of the Holy Spirit. We remember, rejoice and renew with our SSpS (Blue Sisters) together with our SSpSAP (Pink Sisters) for 100 years of missionary presence in the Philippines.

* * *

Our present SVD superior general, Fr. Antonio Pernia, SVD, is himself a “product” of the SSpS educational system in the Philippines. He had his elementary education at Holy Spirit School in Tagbilaran City in Bohol. Aside from the quality education he received from the school, Father Pernia acknowledges that he partly owes his vocation to the religious missionary life to these sisters who “come across as persons filled with the Spirit of God, radiating the joy of being religious and missionaries, disciples of Jesus caught up with the vision of the Master.”

* * *

On a personal note, one significant and unforgettable person in my life was Sr.

Idmara Nolledo, SspS, who was assigned to Christ the King Seminary when we were first year in high school. She was really like a mother to us. She was such a joyful, humble and committed person. And diligent! She taught us to be orderly and clean and to practice good manners and right conduct. Here was one adult who left her indelible “heartprint” on us growing boys.

* * *

We must never underestimate the tremendous effect we have on children. Having said this, we too must never underestimate the tremendous capabilities and possibilities of children. The children believe in us. Let us also believe in them.

* * *

A moment with the Lord:

Lord, remind me that humility, trust, simplicity and joy are not for children only, but for adults also. Amen.

Read Next
LATEST STORIES
MOST READ
Don't miss out on the latest news and information.
View comments

Subscribe to INQUIRER PLUS to get access to The Philippine Daily Inquirer & other 70+ titles, share up to 5 gadgets, listen to the news, download as early as 4am & share articles on social media. Call 896 6000.

TAGS: children, feast of Sto. Niño, religion and belief
For feedback, complaints, or inquiries, contact us.


© Copyright 1997-2019 INQUIRER.net | All Rights Reserved

We use cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. By continuing, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. To find out more, please click this link.