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The final accounting

The story is told about a man who told his friend over the phone to come up to his condo unit, and press the #7 button in the elevator with his elbow. When asked why with his elbow, his response was “You’re not coming empty-handed for my birthday party, are you?”

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In today’s Gospel (Mt. 25, 14-30), Jesus reminds us in the Parable of the Talents that there will be a final accounting with God at the end of our lives. The Lord expects us to make use of whatever He has given to us, and not come before Him empty-handed, so to say.

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There are people who claim that they have achieved or earned much with their talents and abilities, proclaiming themselves to be “self-made,” and are therefore not accountable to anyone, not even to God. May we not fall into the trap of foolish pride and vainglory.

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“To whom much is given, much will be required” (Luke 12:48). Instead of being proud and complacent with our worldly wealth and achievements, we must be vigilant to share our time, talents, and treasures as much as we can, and while we still can.

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“I’m plenty-nine years old, and I’m one hundred and plenty pounds.” That’s how a lady answers when questioned about her age and weight. Yes, in this world we can make plenty of half-truths and lies to get by, but in the final accounting there will be no room for falsehood and alibis.

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Instead of counting your money, make your money count. Use your time, talents, and treasures for your salvation, not for your condemnation.

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Someone pointed out that gratitude leads to generosity. A person who is grateful to God, and who trusts in God’s providence is more open to share, than a person who takes pride in his abilities and diligence, and who is insecure of losing what he/she has earned.

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Please remember that when your standard of living increases, so, too, must your standard of giving.

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Let us never forget that we have received more in life. Our so-called achievements are little compared to the blessings we have received from God. May we live a life filled with thanks, and giving—thanksgiving!

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Please be reminded that: Grace is receiving from God good things we don’t deserve; Mercy is not receiving from God bad things we deserve. Thank you, Lord, for your grace and mercy through the years!

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The Parable of the Talents is not so much about making more, as sharing more; not so much about self-fulfillment, as self-emptying; not so much about self-aggrandizement, as self-effacement; not so much about earthly as about heavenly reward.

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No more, please. The year 2020 has been filled with much suffering and calamities for us, as a country, and as a people. Sana, no more. Let us not give up nor lose hope. Let us continue to be generous in helping others and sharing our time, talents, and treasures. Sana, all.

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“Harinawa.” A thanksgiving concert by seminarians of Christ the King Mission Seminary, under the baton of Prof. Ramon Acoymo, Ph.D., to thank CKMS alumni and benefactors, in commemoration of the fifth anniversary of “Laudato Si” (on the care of creation), in honor of the Solemnity of Christ the King of the Universe (Live on Nov. 16, 4 p.m. with limited guests). Replay via Facebook (Divine Word Media; Diocesan Shrine of the Divine Word) on Nov. 20, 21, 22 at 4 p.m. and 8 p.m.

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Think about this: The saddest words to hear at the end of our lives is: “You wasted it.”

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A moment with the Lord:

Lord, in the final accounting may I not be found guilty and wanting. Amen.

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TAGS: Gospel, Jerry M. Orbos, Moments
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