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What checks and balances?

05:01 AM June 03, 2019

With no less than “super” lawyer Estelito Mendoza railing against the slowness of the Supreme Court in dispensing justice (“Turtle pace of cases
in the SC,” 5/3/19), what can ordinary mortals do to obtain justice in this country during their lifetime? Would a repeated “motion for early resolution” help to remind the justices of their ethical and constitutional duty?

We asked our law professors this question, and they have the same answer: NO. Those justices don’t like being told how “slow” they are. Neither do they give a hoot what the people—the taxpayers who pay for their salaries and perks—think. Lalo ka lang mapapasama ’pag nangulit ka. They are also human: They can be irascible, vindictive and, alas, childish!

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Those spoiled “gods of Padre Faura” know only too well they can be dethroned only by Congress (or now, also by the Office of the Solicitor General), which takes its cue from the President. As long as they continue pleasing the President in cases that really matter to him, politics talks, ethics walks. Separation of powers can go hang.

With the three branches of government no longer caring about checks and balances, let’s not kid ourselves anymore: Martial law (aka dictatorship) has virtually been in effect all over the country.

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To President Duterte: Please make good your word na ayaw mo ’yung may reklamo ang mga tao! Please do something about the Supreme Court being such a pain in the people’s asses.

GABRIELLE MICHELLE M. AGUILLERA, [email protected]

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TAGS: estelito mendoza, Gabrielle Michelle M. Aguillera, Inquirer letters, Supreme Court
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