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Heels and heroes

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Reports on officials “sick, sick, sick” from gorging at the pork barrel straddle headlines and newscasts. These smudged the reports on the passing, last week, of a soldier who wrote on how guerrillas seized the “Koga Papers,” which radically altered World War II’s liberation battle for the Philippines.

Posted: December 6th, 2013 in Columnists,Columns,Featured Columns,Featured Headline,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Cruel

The photograph taken by Inquirer correspondent Karlos Manlupig of children playing “luksong tinik” in an evacuation center in Zamboanga City, published on page A10 of Wednesday’s issue, may have brought a rueful smile to many readers.

Posted: September 18th, 2013 in Editor's Pick,Editorial | Read More »

Title of letter ‘deeply offensive’

The title of Mario Guarina’s letter, “Reminiscent of the British policy that brought about World War II” (Opinion, 7/24/13), is deeply offensive. The British policy of appeasement, although flawed, was designed to try and prevent war—an objective that was perhaps understandable given that limited time had passed since 37 million people had been killed during World War I.

Posted: July 25th, 2013 in Inquirer Opinion,Letters to the Editor | Read More »

Is the Pentagon preparing for war with China?

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It’s important for Filipinos to be aware of the probability of war between the United States and China because the Spratlys may be the flashpoint in such a development.

Posted: July 4th, 2013 in Columnists,Columns,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

How Maguindanao and Cotabato rulers helped Sulu win Sabah

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AN IRANUN sea raider, attired in cotton-quilted vest and armed with a spear, kris and “kampilan” decorated with human hair. The Iranuns were subjects of Sultan Kudarat.  PHOTO BY James Francis Warren, “Iranun and Balangingi: Globalization, Maritime Raiding and the Birth of Ethnicity.” 2002

The Sultanate of Maguindanao and the kingdom of Buayan in upper Cotabato played key roles in ending a civil war in Brunei in the 17th century that resulted in the Sulu sultanate being rewarded a huge swath of territory called Sabah.

Posted: March 30th, 2013 in Featured Gallery,Inquirer Opinion,Talk of the Town | Read More »

The global march toward peace

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If we were hoping for peace in our time, 2012 did not deliver it. Conflict grew ever bloodier in Syria, continued to grind on in Afghanistan, and flared up periodically in West, Central and East Africa. There were multiple episodes of ethnic, sectarian, and politically motivated violence in Burma (Myanmar), South Asia, and around the Middle East. Tensions between China and its neighbors have escalated in the South China Sea, and between China and Japan in the East China Sea. Concerns about North Korea’s and Iran’s nuclear programs remain unresolved.

Posted: December 31st, 2012 in Columnists,Columns,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Wars

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Ma. Lourdes Sereno had a very interesting thing to say to the Judicial and Bar Council (JBC) when it was her turn to be interviewed last week. Appointing an “outsider” as chief justice, she said, was like appointing a civilian rather than a general to lead an army to war. The notion of appointing an outsider to patch up the fissures or rifts within the Supreme Court was a case of trying to solve a nonexistent problem. “What is there to heal? There is nothing to fix.

Posted: July 31st, 2012 in Columnists,Columns,Editor's Pick,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

US military atrocities abroad

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An insightful article in the March 26, 2012, issue of Newsweek reminded worldwide readers of the My Lai massacre in Vietnam on March 16, 1968, when American soldiers entered the village of My Lai and left it a few hours later with between 300 and 500 Vietnamese dead, most of them unarmed women, children and seniors. The article was illustrated with a black-and-white photograph of Lt. William Calley (the only soldier convicted of this crime, who was given a 20-year prison sentence, but was actually released after three and a half years of house arrest!) and a horrendous color photograph of the bodies of slain women and four toddlers sprawled on a dirt road.

Posted: April 10th, 2012 in Columnists,Columns,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Damascus at Dawn

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The sound of what seemed like thunder wakes me up at 3 a.m., Monday, a few hours after I arrived in Damascus on my mission to assess the situation on the ground as head of the House of Representatives’ Committee on Overseas Workers’ Affairs. Storm coming, I think, and my jetlagged brain plunges back to sleep.

Posted: March 20th, 2012 in Columnists,Columns,Featured Columns,Featured Headline,Viewpoints | Read More »

Clear, present danger

Is any story worth risking a life for? Journalists grapple with that question whenever they find themselves in a place or situation where their duty to the integrity of their reportage also means putting their lives on the line. To seek the truth and report about it sometimes mean butting heads with those who’d find such truth-telling injurious to their own interests—not least, say, the well-armed government of a country desperate to hide from the world the oppression and violence it imposes on its unarmed citizenry.

Posted: February 28th, 2012 in Editor's Pick,Editorial,Featured Columns,Featured Headline,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

I’ll be seeing you

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Last Monday my favorite FM station, dwBR, to which I’m tuned in from 6 a.m. to 4 p.m (every day!) featured on the “Twin Blast” portion (the same song rendered by two different artists) of the afternoon program “Musical Souvenirs” my favorite choral groups, the Norman Luboff Choir and the Cascading Voices, singing one of the most romantic and beautifully poignant songs ever composed for popular music, “I’ll Be Seeing You.”

Posted: December 19th, 2011 in Columnists,Columns,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Toward a peaceful Pacific

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MELBOURNE—The Western Pacific is currently facing a difficult problem: how to accommodate China’s rising aspirations in a region where the United States has held primacy since the Cold War’s end. Is the US determined to maintain dominance in the Asia-Pacific region? Or is it willing to operate through multilateral forums that allow all involved parties [...]

Posted: December 8th, 2011 in Columnists,Columns,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

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