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Is pushing a button learning?

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Perhaps I will be a more credible speaker at literacy workshops with this experience I am going through with my grandson Diego, who is in the throes of the Terrible Threes. How everyone in the family laughed when I threw up my arms in exasperation, saying that all my literacy beliefs were being put to a test. For Diego had just dealt me a cruel blow—rejecting my offer of a book to read, and preferring to do so on his parents’ hand-me-down iPad.

Posted: January 17th, 2014 in Columns,Featured Columns,Featured Headline,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Reading: the key to everything

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About a year ago, in his presentation in one of the literacy policy dialogues of the Department of Education, Marcial Salvatierra of the Education Development Center (EDC) said we could significantly improve the reading competency of learners in the early grades through a focused set of interventions implemented consistently over time.

Posted: December 6th, 2013 in Columns,Featured Columns,Featured Headline,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

‘Golden window’ to have a happier, smarter child

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The average 18-month-old can say about 10 to 30 words, but some normal 18-month-olds can say only five words.

Posted: October 24th, 2013 in Columnists,Columns,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Teenage bibliophile

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While other teenagers always get berated by their parents because of playing too many online games, partying until midnight and spending too much time with their boyfriends or girlfriends, I get in trouble for reading books way past my bedtime.

Posted: August 26th, 2013 in Columnists,Columns,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

The love for reading is alive and well

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I am normally hostile to persistent e-mail messages that have not been detected as spam and are not totally in the junk genre. I actually feel a degree of accomplishment—the same high one experiences in clearing one’s desk—in deleting them without taking the trouble of reading them. Experience has proven that there is little to be lost in the process. It is these times that make me nostalgic for the days when we were young and innocent—and totally analog.

Posted: July 26th, 2013 in Columns,Featured Columns,Featured Headline,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

‘Basa, mga kapatid!’

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In recent years, the Department of Education has been highlighting the third Tuesday of the month through a memo to all public schools enjoining them to celebrate National Children’s Book Day (NCBD) through storytelling, read-alouds, Drop Everything and Read sessions, and other reading promotion activities. Of course, there is also the presidentially mandated Philippine Book Development Month in November that the National Book Development Board (NBDB) spearheads—but surely, it will not be superfluous for us to have more than one month devoted to literacy endeavors (sarcasm intended).

Posted: July 12th, 2013 in Columns,Featured Columns,Featured Headline,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Reading: not easy to teach or learn

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In the June 4 edition of Public Education NewsBlast, an online weekly of the Los Angeles Education Partnership (LAEP), is a link to an article by Motoko Rich that first appeared in the New York Times titled “In Raising Scores, 1 2 3 Is Easier Than A B C.” A title as catchy as that will certainly draw attention.

Posted: June 21st, 2013 in Columns,Featured Columns,Featured Headline,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Too important to leave to educators

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As expected, the opening of classes has brought the Department of Education back in the glare of publicity once again. The usual shortages of teachers, classrooms, and books are highlighted, the K to 12 program is under critical scrutiny, as well as liberal and nonrestrictive class sizes that accommodate all students, students overage for the classes they belong to, students not yet reading in Grade 3… And the list goes on.

Posted: June 7th, 2013 in Columns,Featured Columns,Featured Headline,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Reading rocks, copyright rules

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That was the catchy slogan of this year’s celebration of World Book and Copyright Day on April 23, an annual event traditionally spearheaded by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (Unesco). It is a day meant to honor authors and literature and to call attention to the need to respect copyright.

Posted: April 26th, 2013 in Columns,Featured Columns,Featured Headline,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Searching for the girl who reads

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All the girls I ever fell for were girls who read. By “fell,” I mean the absolutely-could-not-get-her-out-of-my-mind-for-years-until-she-posted-her-engagement-ring-on-Facebook-and-prominently-tagged-me kind. The pretty ones are easy to forget, especially if they stop being pretty the moment they open their mouths. It is the girls who read who gently slip their fingers into your subconscious and never let go. [...]

Posted: February 13th, 2013 in Columnists,Columns,Editor's Pick,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

The pleasure of reading and the joys of writing

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It is beyond dispute that bookshops and libraries are the very reflection of a learned society. It also follows that the reading habits, and not merely the pattern or pastime, of its people show the degree of its academic culture and the depth of its intellectual civilization.

Posted: January 23rd, 2013 in Columnists,Columns,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

The world did not end … neither will the book

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IF YOU are still able to read this, it means the end of the world did not take place on Dec. 21 as direly predicted—and perhaps anticipated with much dread? And it is a good time as any, having surpassed that obstacle, to look ahead but only after taking stock of how far we have gone in digital publishing.

Posted: December 28th, 2012 in Columns,Featured Columns,Featured Headline,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

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