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Clones?

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“Don’t cry For Me Argentina” is a song from a 1978 Broadway musical. Evita Peron sang this from the Casa Rosada balcony, expressing regrets and defiance. “No llores por mi Argentina/ The truth is I never left you / All through my wild days / My mad existence/ I kept my promise….”

Posted: February 17th, 2014 in Columnists,Columns,Editor's Pick,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Madness

For one wild moment it seemed like a scene from that memorable protest rally in Manila in February 1986, days before the People Power revolt, when Citizen Cory called for a boycott of institutions, business firms, and newspapers owned or associated with the dictator Ferdinand Marcos and his cronies.

Posted: October 17th, 2013 in Editor's Pick,Editorial | Read More »

The limits of people power

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The Second Million People March (MPM) to protest the abuse of the pork barrel, this time held in Makati City on Oct. 4, turned out to be a pathetic parody of the 1986 People Power Revolution that toppled Ferdinand Marcos’ dictatorship.

Posted: October 9th, 2013 in Columnists,Columns,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

The Virata factor

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Much has been said about the naming of the University of the Philippines College of Business Administration in Diliman after former Prime Minister Cesar E.A. Virata.

Posted: July 22nd, 2013 in Columnists,Columns,Editor's Pick,Featured Columns,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

‘Incomprehensible’ Conrad de Quiros

I simply cannot understand why columnist Conrado de Quiros keeps repeating the same tired arguments against resigned Senate President Juan Ponce Enrile (Opinion, “Arrogance,” 6/10/13).

Posted: June 14th, 2013 in Inquirer Opinion,Letters to the Editor | Read More »

At long last

After all these years, official recognition. The soon-to-be-signed Human Rights Victims Reparation and Recognition Act of 2013 sets aside at least P10 billion as compensation for victims of human rights abuses committed by the Marcos dictatorship. Substantial as the amount is, however, the real import of the new measure is not accounting, but accountability. For the first time—and for all time—the state acknowledges its duty to fulfill a double act of recognition.

Posted: January 31st, 2013 in Editor's Pick,Editorial,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Ninoy’s family entitled to compensation

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I think of Purificacion Viernes whom I interviewed and photographed in the early 1980s. She was in a hospital bed, her feet raised by strings and pulleys, the burned soles of her feet showing proof of torture. She recounted how soldiers strafed her home and killed members of her family. Wounded, Purificacion played dead. A soldier burned the soles of her feet with a lighter to find out if she was alive or dead….

Posted: January 31st, 2013 in Columnists,Columns,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Finding the Marcos loot

Twenty-six years after Edsa I, the fabled treasure hoard of the late Ferdinand Marcos continues to dazzle and intrigue. During his 20 years in power, the strongman and his wife Imelda, as well as a number of their cronies, were believed to have moved billions of dollars of public funds to bank accounts and investments in Switzerland, the United States and other countries. So much wealth was taken from the country that no precise amount of the loot has been given to this day. And very little has been recovered so far.

Posted: November 26th, 2012 in Editor's Pick,Editorial,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Highly contagious

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“COUNT ON Americans to do the right thing—after they’ve tried everything else,” Winston Churchill once joked. They did the right thing is what our e-mail traffic indicates, after Barack Obama trounced Mitt Romney with 303 Electoral College votes to win reelection.

Posted: November 9th, 2012 in Columnists,Columns,Editor's Pick,Featured Columns,Featured Headline,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Marcoses in contempt

About two weeks ago, human rights victims suing the Marcos dictatorship won another, important legal victory. Whether this will bring the victims closer to realizing the legal justice they have already received—in 1992, the United States District Court for Hawaii ordered the estate of Ferdinand Marcos to pay the victims nearly $2 billion in damages—remains to be seen. But the new judgment puts additional pressure on the Marcos family, undermines the estate’s legal strategy and allows the human rights claimants wider scope for collecting on the damages. For all these reasons, we join the many who hail the ruling as both just and necessary.

Posted: November 4th, 2012 in Editor's Pick,Editorial,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

En-riling

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I said it before: Juan Ponce Enrile has got to be one of the luckiest persons on earth. In at least two life-changing, or history-altering, situations, he was there at the right place at the right time.

Posted: October 1st, 2012 in Columnists,Columns,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Moneybags

Who did not hear of the name Herminio Disini in the 1970s and 1980s? A close associate and golfing buddy of the strongman Ferdinand Marcos, Disini finessed the eponymous Herdis Group until it acquired mythic proportions. Time magazine reported in 1978 that the man was able to transform a small cigarette filter manufacturing plant into an empire of 33 companies with total assets amounting to some $200 million in just six years. The companies were engaged in oil exploration, mining, textile manufacturing, and charter flights, among others. The empire was said to have peaked at $1 billion in total assets—then and now a mind-blowing sum.

Posted: April 16th, 2012 in Editor's Pick,Editorial,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

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