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Women legislators in action

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Rare is the time when government officials and politicians cross interchamber borders to heap praise on each other. But during the celebration of International Women’s Day (which is officially marked tomorrow, March 8) at the House of Representatives, congresswomen led the adoption of HR 53 commending Social Welfare Secretary Dinky Soliman “for her strong commitment to public service and selfless dedication to alleviate the plight of disaster-stricken Filipinos.”

Posted: March 7th, 2014 in Columnists,Columns,Editor's Pick,Featured Columns,Featured Headline,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

The real problem with leadership

The failure to maintain basic respect for life explains the moral-spiritual decline in modern times. It was a destructive tendency that man strayed into since the very beginning, misperceiving and misinterpreting the realities of life.

Posted: February 3rd, 2014 in Inquirer Opinion,Letters to the Editor | Read More »

Back to ‘Juristic Park’

The way things are taking shape, Napolesgate, which began in the court of public opinion, will come home to roost in the courts of law. The Filipino fascination with law as almost a secular religion is perplexing, since the Supreme Court itself twice validated pork barrel in the past.

Posted: November 6th, 2013 in Editor's Pick,Editorial,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

When those who rule us are thieves

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Something dangerous can happen to a society when people no longer trust their leaders because they perceive them to be no different from ordinary thieves except that they steal more and can buy respectability. If a nation cannot act resolutely to confront the problem and find a collective solution, the resulting demoralization and cynicism among its citizens could produce a climate conducive to crime. If lawmakers are perceived to be themselves lawbreakers, and the police are barely distinguishable from criminals, can we expect ordinary people to respect society’s norms?

Posted: October 19th, 2013 in Columnists,Columns,Editor's Pick,Featured Columns,Featured Headline,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Abakada leadership a settled issue

This has reference to the leadership issue and legal standing of the Abakada-Guro Party List (Abakada for brevity), which was recently proclaimed by the Commission on Elections as one of the winning party-list groups in the May 2013 elections.

Posted: August 15th, 2013 in Inquirer Opinion,Letters to the Editor | Read More »

Leadership and a DICT

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I talked about the importance of leadership recently (Inquirer, 2/28/13) and how it determines the path of a country using the two Koreas as a dramatic example. Leadership is particularly important in a hierarchical society like the Philippines. On the larger scale, it can determine where a country goes, but it can also affect what happens in a particular sector, or a specific issue. And it can affect not only that sector or issue but a wider sphere through indirect impact.

Posted: March 13th, 2013 in Columnists,Columns,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Due to ‘Noynoying,’ Atenean missed key Reuter lesson

In a retreat conducted a long, long time ago for an Ateneo graduating class, which I attended, the retreat master, Fr. James Reuter, SJ, planted in our minds the idea that there are two kinds of Ateneans—the real ones and the fake ones. The real ones are those who believe that “they are men for others” (Ateneo was not coed then). The fake ones are those who believe that “they are better than others.”

Posted: March 8th, 2013 in Inquirer Opinion,Letters to the Editor | Read More »

Now is the time to expose the corrupt

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Let me take last week’s column a bit further. We have a President who is changing society, or trying to. Political games he plays (successfully, I might add), but a trapo he is not. His “daang matuwid” has resonated in the public arena, and his honest lifestyle is setting an example for many to follow. Attacking corruption at the top is working, but it now has to be expanded. We all know who the corrupt are, so the President now has to widen his net and take them down, too.

Posted: February 21st, 2013 in Columnists,Columns,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Standing by his President

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He can’t wait to leave government service. Cabinet Secretary Rene Almendras says that as soon as he turns over to President Aquino all remaining “deliverables,” before P-Noy’s term comes to an end in 2016, he hopes he will walk away from his post and return to the private sector.   The only reason he joined [...]

Posted: January 17th, 2013 in Columnists,Columns,Editor's Pick,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Clueless, couldn’t-care-less, unscrupulous

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In August 2010, I tried my hand at classifying the types of criticism directed at President Aquino, then a mere six weeks in office. In “‘Politico,’ ‘Inglisero,’ ‘hacendero,’” I identified three emerging patterns in the criticism.

Posted: October 1st, 2012 in Columnists,Columns,Featured Columns,Featured Headline,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

P-Noy a sincere leader?

President Aquino is about to complete his first three years in office (one-half of his term of office) by the end of May next year. However, I regret to say that up to the present he has not displayed enough guts to properly lead his people. On the contrary, he failed as a leader to show sincerity in most of his actuations.

Posted: September 13th, 2012 in Inquirer Opinion,Letters to the Editor | Read More »

Finding ‘me’

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Everyone is born blind—that is, oblivious to the world that doesn’t concern us. We who were born with a silver spoon in our mouth choose to see the world to which we are accustomed. In my local church there is a youth group of which I have been a member for almost five years. In this group are people from all walks of life and social classes which I had considered beneath me. They seemed so different from me in many ways: Most of them could not converse fluently in English; many came from public schools that I considered “jeje” or generally not worth my time.

Posted: September 13th, 2012 in Columnists,Columns,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

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