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Shooting justice

Despite our continued exposure to an excess of high-profile or sensational crimes, the assassination of a judge still sends us reeling, still strikes us as deeply offensive. Why? Because we sense it for what it is: an attack on something fundamental, something basic, to our way of life.

Posted: March 3rd, 2014 in Editor's Pick,Editorial,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

A serious miscarriage of justice (2)

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For doing his duty as labor arbiter of the National Labor Relations Commission (NLRC), Ariel Cadiente Santos was sued for graft by the defendant employer for allegedly giving undue advantage to a dismissed employee. At the same time, he filed an administrative complaint against Santos with the Office of the Ombudsman.

Posted: February 2nd, 2014 in Columnists,Columns,Editor's Pick,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Atimonan a year later

The incident was bad enough. Eleven of 13 policemen and civilians were killed with multiple gunshots, a number with two wounds in the head, the worst showing 16 fatal shots all over the body. The first vehicle had 196 bullet entry points, the second 61—sustained from an alleged shootout with 22 policemen and 14 military personnel at a checkpoint in Barangay Lumutan, Atimonan, Quezon, on Jan. 6, 2013, or a full year ago.

Posted: January 7th, 2014 in Editor's Pick,Editorial,Featured Columns,Featured Headline,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Justice now in President Aquino’s hands

The news item “Abadilla slay convict seeks P-Noy clemency” (Front Page, 12/24/13) pounces on this reader like a sledgehammer, so to speak. How could there be a conviction when: (a) torture was used in eliciting confessions; (b) the Alex Boncayao Brigade repeatedly claimed responsibility for the crime, in fact showing as proof the watch of Col. Rolando Abadilla, which it turned over to Fr. Robert Reyes; and (c) the conviction was based on the testimony of a lone witness, and neither were there corroborating testimonies nor was there physical evidence.

Posted: January 1st, 2014 in Inquirer Opinion,Letters to the Editor | Read More »

Justice, not just relief

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Those who survived possibly the most powerful typhoon ever to hit land should never have had to wait for days under the rubble for rescue, to “steal” from the dead to stay alive, to sleep beside the bodies of their dead children, or to be crushed to death in a stampede for food. Sacks and sacks of rice should never have lain uncooked for even just a day in warehouses while thousands starved.

Posted: November 27th, 2013 in Columnists,Columns,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Black-hole justice

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Chief Justice Maria Lourdes Sereno was reported as “encouraging lawyers who seem to know about, and have been discussing in ‘hushed tones,’ the corrupt practices of ‘hoodlums in robes’ to blow the whistle on these judges” (“Expose corrupt judges, Sereno urges lawyers,” Second Front Page, 9/27/13).

Posted: November 18th, 2013 in Columnists,Columns,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Filipino concept of justice

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As one of the 10 holders of the “Chief Justice Panganiban Professorial Chairs on Liberty and Prosperity,” Dean Jose Manuel I. Diokno began his lecture with two questions: Is justice an imported Western concept? Do we have a native Filipino concept of justice?

Posted: October 13th, 2013 in Columnists,Columns,Featured Columns,Featured Headline,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Misguided nationalism

The recommended filing of homicide charges against the Coast Guard personnel involved in the fatal shooting of a Taiwanese fisherman in May may be unpopular with some Filipinos who insist that we must defend our defenders at all cost—an example of misguided nationalism that ignores our national interest in using international law to oppose Beijing’s territorial aggrandizement over our seas.

Posted: August 9th, 2013 in Editor's Pick,Editorial,Featured Columns,Featured Headline,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

But of course it’s discrimination

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Who says the courts are deaf to entreaties? They’re not. They’re just deaf to the entreaties of the aggrieved, not of those that make them so.

Posted: July 29th, 2013 in Columnists,Columns,Editor's Pick,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

With Palparan free, no justice for victims

No passing of time or surging adversity can make the families of Sherlyn Cadapan and Karen Empeño and human rights defenders forget that fateful morning of June 26, 2006, when the two university students were forcibly taken by military men and herded like helpless sheep to the darkest depths where evil men perform unimaginable barbaric cruelties.

Posted: July 4th, 2013 in Inquirer Opinion,Letters to the Editor | Read More »

When deferred hope stirs (2)

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“You can seal truth in a grave. But it will always break free.” Easter hammered that truth over the last 2,000 years. Before Easter 2013, did the entombed truth about journalist Jonas Burgos’ abduction start to emerge in a Court of Appeals decision?

Posted: April 1st, 2013 in Columnists,Columns,Editor's Pick,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Still, advice

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Last year, at about this time, close to a thousand law students passed the bar and became lawyers. At the time they did, we were in the thick of the impeachment of Renato Corona. The goings-on in the Senate-turned-impeachment court, in particular the penchant of the lawyers there, current or ex, to obsess on procedure rather than substance, to impress with an ability to quote chapter and verse rather than with a capacity to quest for justice, impelled me to write a column giving a piece of unsolicited advice to the new lawyers.

Posted: March 25th, 2013 in Columnists,Columns,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

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