Quantcast
Home » ill-gotten wealth You are browsing entries tagged with “ill-gotten wealth”

Unrepentant

Sen. Bongbong Marcos had an artful answer when asked about the Presidential Commission on Good Government’s recovery of the remaining $29 million (about P1.3 billion) of the multimillion-dollar Swiss bank deposits stashed away by his father, the late dictator Ferdinand Marcos.

Posted: February 14th, 2014 in Columnists,Editor's Pick,Featured Columns,Featured Headline,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Historical justice

By

The government has been at pains to defend Andres Bautista’s proposal to scrap the Presidential Commission on Good Government, and for good reason. Bautista, head of the PCGG, made his proposal known on New Year’s Day. The hunt for the Marcoses’ ill-gotten wealth, he said, would now go to the justice department.

Posted: January 8th, 2013 in Columnists,Columns,Editor's Pick,Featured Columns,Featured Headline,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

P-Noy giving up on Marcos loot?

ALL ADMINISTRATIONS since Cory Aquino, unlike those in other countries, did not have a strong resolve and missed the historic chance to clean up the mess of autocracy and kleptocracy. Letting the Marcoses get away with plunder and corruption and other political-economic transgressions against the Filipino people would be a monumental error that would reverse the gains of People Power and destroy what little faith we have left in this democracy. It is a virtual indictment of our supposed democracy that our institutions, with all their vast powers, have to bow down to and crumble before private, self-aggrandizing interests of the remorseless greedy who wield immense wealth and influence.

Posted: January 3rd, 2013 in Inquirer Opinion,Letters to the Editor | Read More »

Finding the Marcos loot

Twenty-six years after Edsa I, the fabled treasure hoard of the late Ferdinand Marcos continues to dazzle and intrigue. During his 20 years in power, the strongman and his wife Imelda, as well as a number of their cronies, were believed to have moved billions of dollars of public funds to bank accounts and investments in Switzerland, the United States and other countries. So much wealth was taken from the country that no precise amount of the loot has been given to this day. And very little has been recovered so far.

Posted: November 26th, 2012 in Editor's Pick,Editorial,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Those pesky proverbs

By

DO IMELDA Marcos and Ferdinand Jr. use the same dictionary ordinary Filipinos work by? Read the senator’s delayed reaction to the close to $354-million contempt judgment, slammed by the US Court of Appeals (Ninth Circuit) against them.

Posted: November 5th, 2012 in Columnists,Columns,Editor's Pick,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

The irony of martial law victims’ fate

By

I wrote many years back that, for the martial law torture victims, the “unkindest cut of all” is not in being forgotten but in being misunderstood. The other day, they suffered another legal setback, in yet another instance of foreign courts misunderstanding the role of the extraterritorial adjudication of human rights abuses. The US court [...]

Posted: June 28th, 2012 in Columnists,Columns,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Unsettled questions

By

In his keynote speech at the launch of the book “History of the Supreme Court” to mark the Court’s 111th anniversary on June 11, former Chief Justice Reynato Puno decried the “spiritual slump” and apparent disarray in the judiciary in the aftermath of its “collision with the political branches of government,” as well as the widespread confusion following the conviction of now ex-Chief Justice Renato Corona by the Senate impeachment tribunal. But because of Corona’s decision not to appeal his removal, we will never know for sure how a “severely wounded” Court would have dealt with certain questions the answers to which were left hanging in the course of his impeachment trial.

Posted: June 22nd, 2012 in Columns,Featured Columns,Featured Headline,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Filing charges against Corona is a duty

By

The philosopher Confucius was not confused when he said: “In a country that is well governed, poverty is something to be ashamed of; in a badly governed country, wealth is something to be ashamed of.”

Posted: June 21st, 2012 in Columnists,Columns,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Consequences of conviction

By

In its written “Judgment” dated May 29, 2012, the Senate convicted Chief Justice Renato C. Corona and imposed “the penalty of removal from office and disqualification to hold any office under the Republic of the Philippines.”

Posted: June 9th, 2012 in Columnists,Columns,Editor's Pick,Featured Columns,Featured Headline,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

‘Hollow men’

By

What makes the embattled 23rd Supreme Court chief tick? Renato Corona testifies before the impeachment court today—finally. Will we glimpse the tragedy of hollow men?

Posted: May 21st, 2012 in Columnists,Columns,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Why Renato Corona is not Jesus Christ

By

Renato Corona faces the impeachment court today (Tuesday). This is as good a way as any to sum up what he’s been to us.

Posted: May 21st, 2012 in Columnists,Columns,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

‘Performances’ to watch for

By

These are days of anticipation for many Filipinos. Today, Chief Justice Renato Corona will testify before the Senate impeachment trial, that is, if he keeps his word. Perhaps then we will finally get to the bottom of his allegedly hidden wealth—be it in dollars or pesos—and why such monies aren’t reflected in his statements of assets, liabilities and net worth, as required by law.

Posted: May 21st, 2012 in Columnists,Columns,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Advertisement

News

  • 12 dead, 96 injured in Holy Week accidents–NDRRMC
  • Filipino devotees re-enact crucifixion of Christ
  • Rouhani talks peace, outreach at army parade
  • Rains, thunderstorms on Good Friday
  • Carbon monoxide leak suffocates 20 in Catbalogan City
  • Sports

  • Heat seek Three-peat but Spurs, Pacers top seeds
  • Can Spurs get back at Heat? Can they survive West?
  • Hopkins, 49, seeks win for the ageless
  • LeBron still No. 1 with NBA’s most popular jersey
  • Pacquiao back in PH, heads home to wife, kids
  • Lifestyle

  • Levine designs womenswear with help from fiancee
  • Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Nobel laureate, dies at 87
  • Ford Mustang turns 50 atop Empire State Building
  • Pro visual artists, lensmen to judge Pagcor’s photo contest
  • ‘Labahita a la bacalao’
  • Entertainment

  • ‘X-men’ filmmaker slams ‘fabricated’ sex attack claims
  • Singer Chris Brown’s bodyguard on trial in DC
  • Whoopi Goldberg debuts as marijuana columnist
  • ‘X-men’ director accused of sex assault on teen boy
  • Cannes film festival launches race for 2014 Palme d’Or
  • Business

  • Italy sells luxury state cars on eBay
  • Asian shares mostly up in quiet trade
  • Dollar up in Asia on US jobs data, Ukraine deal
  • Barbie doll has a problem
  • Oil prices mixed ahead of long Easter weekend
  • Technology

  • Nokia recalls 30,000 chargers for Lumia 2520 tablet
  • Facebook rolls out ‘nearby friends’ feature
  • Netizens seethe over Aquino’s ‘sacrifice’ message
  • Filipinos #PrayForSouthKorea
  • Taylor Swift tries video blogging, crashes into fan’s bridal shower
  • Opinion

  • Editorial cartoon, April 17, 2014
  • A humbler Church
  • Deepest darkness
  • ‘Agnihotra’ for Earth’s health
  • It’s the Holy Week, time to think of others
  • Global Nation

  • WHO warns vs spread of MERS-Cov, urges vigilance in taking precautions
  • Last call for nominations to ’14 Presidential Awards
  • San Francisco business coalition slams proposed tax on sugary drinks
  • A ‘time-travel’ production of ‘Les Miserable’ at Stanford
  • Filipina Maryknoll sister honored for years of service
  • Marketplace
    Advertisement