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Mabini by Mabini

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Unlike Rizal, who left 25 volumes of writing to keep an academic industry alive, Apolinario Mabini left only two volumes that are not readily available to general readers in English or Filipino.

Posted: July 23rd, 2014 in Columnists,Columns,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

‘Home’ on the pages of a book

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On their way back to their base in Laoang, Northern Samar, writer-couple Romy and Jesselynn de la Cruz were aboard a habal-habal, a motorcycle retrofitted with a long plank of wood to accommodate more passengers, when their driver miscalculated his speed over a muddy road and threw off his passengers.

Posted: July 22nd, 2014 in Columnists,Columns,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Mabini in exile

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Textbook history has reduced Apolinario Mabini into “The Sublime Paralytic,” whatever that means. To complicate matters, Mabini is sometimes referred to as the “Brains of the Revolution,” which confuses students who know that the same title applies to Emilio Jacinto.

Posted: July 18th, 2014 in Columnists,Columns,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

How to kill a rat

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One of the funniest travel accounts of the country is “An Englishwoman in the Philippines” by Campbell Dauncey (1906). Her comments on Philippine life and the American colonials in 1904 are an engaging read. She described Manila, Malacañang, and William Howard Taft who made a return visit to the Philippines as US secretary of war. She poked fun at everyone and everything in deadpan British humor that did not amuse an American who had read the original book scanned by Google. On the first chapter is handwritten: “The English should stay Home!”

Posted: July 9th, 2014 in Columnists,Columns,Editor's Pick,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Japan under our skin

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Toshinao Urabe, ambassador of Japan, led us through a delicate dinner at his residence recently, which made me realize that the Japanese really eat with their eyes. An elaborate dinner service, fine lacquerware and creative plating of each dish delighted our senses before the food was actually tasted and consumed. This was cultural diplomacy at its best. As they say, one of the best ways into people’s hearts is through the belly.

Posted: June 27th, 2014 in Columnists,Columns,Featured Columns,Featured Headline,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

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