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Mabini vs the Rich

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Someone once commented that I am like an ostrich who hides my head in the past instead of commenting on current social issues. If I were to be relevant in this critic’s eyes, then today’s column should be on Typhoon “Glenda” or President Aquino’s challenge to the Supreme Court on its ruling that the Disbursement Acceleration Program is unconstitutional. I leave the present to my fellow columnists who can cover the issues far better than me. My column title is, after all, “Looking Back.”

Posted: July 16th, 2014 in Columnists,Columns,Editor's Pick,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Syphilis and sex videos

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Sex videos were “thrown in” in an attempt to block the confirmation of Leila de Lima’s appointment as justice secretary.

Posted: June 20th, 2014 in Columnists,Columns,Editor's Pick,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Bonifacio: pardon and execution

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If you read the transcript of the Bonifacio Trial to the end, you will be left asking: What happened? Better still: What really happened?

Posted: May 21st, 2014 in Columnists,Columns,Editor's Pick,Featured Columns,Featured Headline,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

His last day

The current debate debate in history departments over the true date of Andres Bonifacio’s execution, reflected in historian Ambeth Ocampo’s two most recent columns, is not without its advantages. The biggest boon is basic: It provokes discussion about Bonifacio’s place in the Philippines’ pantheon of heroes. The controversy over whether Bonifacio was executed, under orders from Gen. Emilio Aguinaldo, on April 26 or May 10, the traditional date, has served to stimulate more interest in Bonifacio than last year’s commemoration of his 150th birth anniversary.

Posted: May 10th, 2014 in Editor's Pick,Editorial,Featured Columns,Featured Headline,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

‘Anting-anting’ in Philippine history

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“Anting-anting,” like those crude bronze objects sold outside Quiapo church, may have gone out of fashion, but people still believe in luck and charms that are supposed to attract good fortune and repel the bad. Take a look at the rear view mirror next time you are on public transport there, most likely you will see a rosary, Chinese coins and/or laminated holy pictures. Some jeeps and taxicabs have an entire mini-altar on the dashboard to insure a safe trip. Despite his being stricken off the official list of Catholic saints, Christopher or Cristobal in sticker or magnetic form still guard us on the road. It is surprising that the Virgin of Antipolo that protected galleons that sailed the Manila-Acapulco route, the same miraculous image given the title “Our Lady of Peace and Good Voyage,” is not used on the road as well. When Rizal travelled to Europe a lithograph of the Virgin of Antipolo was glued to his trunk to protect against loss or delay in his luggage.

Posted: February 26th, 2014 in Columnists,Columns,Editor's Pick,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

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