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BIR as top human rights violator

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It took the Bureau of Internal Revenue’s disgraceful ad featuring a doctor sitting on a teacher’s shoulders for citizens to protest. However, this was only the latest installment in an increasingly alarming shame campaign that must be reexamined under the lens of human rights.

Posted: March 12th, 2014 in Columnists,Columns,Editor's Pick,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

‘Backward by a century’

This best describes the Supreme Court’s decision on the petitions to
declare the Cybercrime Prevention Act unconstitutional.

Posted: February 24th, 2014 in Inquirer Opinion,Letters to the Editor | Read More »

Calling Tito Sotto an idiot is no cybercrime

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The decision of the Supreme Court upholding much of the Cybercrime Prevention Act, including the online libel provision inserted by a now haughty Sen. Tito Sotto, has provoked countless panicked, confused responses.

Posted: February 20th, 2014 in Columnists,Columns,Editor's Pick,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

State weapon to muzzle dissent

While admitting that certain provisions of Republic Act No. 10175 are unconstitutional, Solicitor General Francis Jardeleza maintained that the government needs to fight crimes committed on the Internet.

Posted: March 7th, 2013 in Inquirer Opinion,Letters to the Editor | Read More »

Unembarrassed

When the Supreme Court issued a four-month-long temporary restraining order against the controversial Cybercrime Prevention Act last October, the unusual length of the TRO was widely interpreted as a deferential gesture. The high court wanted to spare Congress the embarrassment of a new law being declared unconstitutional, by giving it enough time to amend or revise the law’s controversial provisions.

Posted: February 7th, 2013 in Editor's Pick,Editorial | Read More »

Achievements

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A remarkable year 2012 was. In his time, President Fidel Ramos brought about some dramatic changes in the business environment—changes that to this day we are still benefiting from. He deregulated the key sectors—sectors that are now vibrant and competitive: telecom (there would be few cell phones today if PLDT had retained its monopoly), power (we’d still be having blackouts), oil and banking.

Posted: January 3rd, 2013 in Columnists,Columns,Featured Columns,Featured Headline,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Real need for cyberlaw unaddressed by RA 10175

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As an IT/cybersecurity practitioner for 16 years, I had foreseen the possible catastrophic impact should malicious hackers launch an attack against our critical cyberinfrastructure. So if you ask me whether we need a cybercrime law or not, my answer is “yes,” definitely. In fact we needed it 10 years ago. However, I agree with the view that libel by ICT shouldn’t be considered a crime.

Posted: December 20th, 2012 in Columnists,Columns,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Cybercrime Prevention Act an ‘incorrectly cooked law’

The Cybercrime Prevention Act is a law that should not be. It came like a horse-kick that dealt a black eye on our freedom of expression. Drawing widespread criticisms, it is now facing several petitions that are seeking its annulment by the Supreme Court. Shoddily crafted, it lacks finish and the intricate details for refinement that could make it look like a flawless gem—no cracks, no holes. Its context and substance clearly show that the law was flimsily enacted—like a food that is either inadequately or incorrectly cooked, say, a hamburger grilled on the engine hood of a car. Thanks to its authors, some of whom have great understanding of law.

Posted: November 16th, 2012 in Inquirer Opinion,Letters to the Editor | Read More »

Alphonse and Gaston

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A popular comic strip in America many years ago featured two bumbling characters, Alphonse and Gaston, both of whom had a penchant for politeness. Gaston, the tall one, would say, “After you, Alphonse,” and the latter, the short one, would insist, “No, you first, my dear Gaston!” The show of excessive politeness would go on and on, with the result that neither could do anything or go anywhere because each insisted on letting the other precede him. Today, the catchphrase “After you, my dear Alphonse” is heard whenever a dare is made to a person to do something difficult or even dangerous.

Posted: October 26th, 2012 in Columnists,Columns,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Remain vigilant of and resist threats to rights

The National Union of Journalists of the Philippines welcomes the Supreme Court’s issuance of a temporary restraining order on the implementation of Republic Act 10175 or the Cybercrime Prevention Act.

Posted: October 19th, 2012 in Inquirer Opinion,Letters to the Editor | Read More »

Of womb and web

Deserving or not, Sen. Vicente Sotto III has become the lightning rod for criticism about the new cybercrime law. Despite initially denying that he had inserted the much-maligned libel provision into the law, he is still seen by many as the culprit because of his recent speeches in the Senate, opposing the Reproductive Health or RH bill, using plagiarized content from blog posts. People may be speculating that he had the most to gain from inserting the libel provision because of his disdain for bloggers and their consequent uproar.

Posted: October 8th, 2012 in Inquirer Opinion,Letters to the Editor | Read More »

The issue is public interest, not freedom of the press

I’ve always wanted to be a journalist, that’s why I took up Mass Communications. I am now in my fourth year.

Posted: October 8th, 2012 in Inquirer Opinion,Letters to the Editor | Read More »

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