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Lamentation for Manila 2014

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Situated just after the prophecies of Jeremiah in the Old Testament, the Book of Lamentations tells of the terrible destruction and sorrow in Jerusalem after the city was conquered by the Babylonians, and the Jewish leaders taken into captivity in 586-520 BC.

Posted: April 17th, 2014 in Columnists,Columns,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Food for thought for the Holy Week

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The message of this Holy Week acquires a deeper significance in the light of the Supreme Court’s decision declaring the Reproductive Health (RH) Law constitutional except for eight provisions related to penalizing parties who do not comply for reason of religious beliefs.

Posted: April 17th, 2014 in Columnists,Columns,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Our only republic

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In his column “Newsstand” (Opinion, 2/12/13), John Nery noted that Malacañang referred to President Aquino as “the 15th President of the Philippines, and the fifth President of the Fifth Republic.” Nery questioned the historical and legal accuracy of a “Fifth Philippine Republic.” We are also doing so.

Posted: March 22nd, 2014 in Columns,Featured Columns,Featured Headline,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Tacloban children not ‘forgotten victims’

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As I must have mentioned in the past, the only daily e-mail blast I welcome is the faithful Google Alert bringing news about books and the love of reading. There are not too many books on the topic to make a daily bulletin, so the Alerts are mostly on the efforts of concerned citizens or private and public library systems to keep the habit of reading alive—and loved.

Posted: March 22nd, 2014 in Columns,Featured Columns,Featured Headline,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Why not nationalism?

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In his column, “The future of democracy” (3/1/14), Randy David examines the role of democracy in paring down poverty. “[W]hy expect democracy to end poverty?” he asks. “Rapid economic development and the distribution of assets have been more associated with authoritarian regimes than with democracies.”

Posted: March 15th, 2014 in Columns,Featured Columns,Featured Headline,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Embedding employability into the curriculum

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Defining education quality tends to be difficult because it depends on who you are and where you’re coming from. If you are the parent of a grade school or high school student, the K-to-12 Law puts things in context by saying that as a matter of policy, every student must have the opportunity to receive quality education that is “globally competitive based on a pedagogically sound curriculum that is at par with international standards.”

Posted: March 15th, 2014 in Columns,Featured Columns,Featured Headline,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

The ‘SOP’ malady

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The pork barrel scam that used nongovernment organizations to siphon off the people’s money is indeed quite brazen. There are many other operations with varying degrees of brazenness—such as “SOP” (standard operating procedure)—but they are all the same: scams.

Posted: March 13th, 2014 in Columnists,Columns,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Not just good but great teachers

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When teachers introduce themselves and their careers with an apologetic “I am only a teacher,” my hackles are raised and I never pass up the chance to chide them and remind them about the vital role they play in the nurturing of hearts and minds.

Posted: March 8th, 2014 in Columns,Featured Columns,Featured Headline,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Persistent poverty and joblessness

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Persistent poverty has been perennially bugging the national leadership and society at large even during periods of economic growth appreciably higher than the long-term norm. It is intimately linked to joblessness, which the Social Weather Stations’ latest survey reported last Feb. 11 at 25.2 percent for 2013 (roughly equivalent to the official un- + under-employment at 24.4 percent), creating quite a media stir. Coincidentally, the SWS news appeared on the same day that the National Economic and Development Authority came out with the updated Philippine Development Plan (PDP), on which the Cabinet was reported to have met for eight hours.

Posted: March 8th, 2014 in Columns,Featured Columns,Featured Headline,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Specialization training for BA and IT instructors

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During the May 2013 summer break, the IT and Business Process Association of the Philippines (Ibpap) and the Commission on Higher Education (CHEd) organized several specialization training sessions for business administration and information technology (BA and IT) instructors from Cavite State University, Laguna State Polytechnic University and Polytechnic University of the Philippines, Tarlac State University, Batangas State University and Negros Oriental State University.

Posted: March 1st, 2014 in Columns,Featured Columns,Featured Headline,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

‘Miracle’ at Edsa?

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I am uncomfortable with throwing around the word “miracle” too easily. In many cases I prefer to speak of Divine Providence, working in history and bringing together a series of contingent—might have been different—events and human decisions to bring about a definite outcome. Let us look at the Edsa 1986 event and some of the happenings and decisions that led to it.

Posted: March 1st, 2014 in Columns,Featured Columns,Featured Headline,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Self-inflicted cybercrime panic

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During the Silly People’s Improv Theater oracle segment the night before the Supreme Court released its decision on the Cybercrime Prevention Act, a spectator asked: “Will I be convicted of a cybercrime this year?” Protesters asked social media users to turn their profile pictures black last Feb. 25 and rally at the Edsa Shrine. Many have spontaneously cursed the high court, but specifics are curiously absent.

Posted: February 28th, 2014 in Columnists,Columns,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

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