Quantcast
Home » byline You are browsing byline “Leonardo L. Leonidas” - Commentary

The ‘brain-pacers’

By

An American news correspondent, Bob Woodruff of ABC TV, suffered a brain injury in 2006 from a roadside bomb while covering the Iraq war.

Posted: March 20th, 2014 in Columnists,Columns,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Boosting the brain

By

Many brain researchers are working on ways and means of boosting the brain to conquer fatigue, sleep, and errors. They want to find the key to helping soldiers fight future wars. US military researchers are leading the way through grants from Darpa (Defense Advanced Project Research Agency). The goal is to produce better soldiers.

Posted: February 14th, 2014 in Columns,Featured Columns,Featured Headline,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Stress during pregnancy is harmful to offspring

By

About seven years ago, a Manila-based couple visited Maine in the United States. They were both physicians-she an anesthesiologist, and he a surgeon. They were there to take a test to become nurses! I asked them why they wanted to migrate to the United States. They said they have a son with autism. At that [...]

Posted: February 5th, 2014 in Columnists,Columns,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Teaching parents about how the brain works

By

In 1921, Lewis Terman, the creator of the IQ (intelligence quotient) test, armed with a large grant from the Commonwealth Foundation, put together a team of field workers and sent them out into the state of California’s elementary schools.

Posted: January 24th, 2014 in Columnists,Columns,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Students need more sleep

By

When I was a medical student, it was common practice to cram and study up to 3 or 4 in the morning before an examination. We believed that by doing so, we would perform better in our semestral tests.

Posted: January 7th, 2014 in Columns,Featured Columns,Featured Headline,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

The brain and meditation in school

By

We are teaching children the four Rs: reading, ’riting, ’rithmetic and research. Why is it that we are not telling them about attention, self-control, mindfulness, motivation and brain function?

Posted: December 16th, 2013 in Columnists,Columns,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Stress and learning

By

Why are we not teaching our students the barriers to learning? We are telling them lots of things to learn, like calculus, chemistry, physics, history, Jose Rizal, etc., but we are not teaching them how the brain functions and learns.

Posted: December 6th, 2013 in Columnists,Columns,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

‘Golden window’ to have a happier, smarter child

By

The average 18-month-old can say about 10 to 30 words, but some normal 18-month-olds can say only five words.

Posted: October 24th, 2013 in Columnists,Columns,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Evidence-based practice for best outcome

By

Ideally, all physicians should use evidence-based practice to get the best outcome, or less complications, for the prescriptions they give or procedures they administer, or not.

Posted: October 13th, 2013 in Columnists,Columns,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Rethinking blood transfusion

By

Most physicians and hospital administrators are firmly entrenched in the belief that blood loss is an unavoidable part of major surgery and that blood banking and transfusion are the antidote to bleeding. Also, with the advances in blood screening, the public is assured that viral infections are significantly reduced—which is true.   However, what both [...]

Posted: September 12th, 2013 in Columnists,Columns,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

A different way of teaching, learning medicine

By

About 17 years ago, Bethany, a former patient of mine, asked if she could shadow me for three months at my office. She had just finished her premed course at the University of Maine. She wanted to apply to a medical school.

Posted: August 7th, 2013 in Columnists,Columns,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

How you can help reduce errors in diagnosis

By

My wife’s knee problem was misdiagnosed by two certified internists, two bone specialists, and a radiologist in Maine in the United States. My interest in medical errors and the opinion of our son, who was then a medical student, led us to discover that my wife’s MRI saying “ruptured meniscus” was wrong. Her real problem was gout, which does not need the surgeon’s knife. We were able to prevent the prescribed surgery.

Posted: June 6th, 2013 in Columnists,Columns,Inquirer Opinion | Read More »

Advertisement

News

  • Magnitude-7.5 earthquake shakes Mexican capital
  • Title of new Hillary Clinton book: ‘Hard Choices’
  • Filipinos, Dutch re-enact crucifixion of Christ
  • 14 killed in car bombing in Homs
  • 57-nation group plays key Ukraine monitoring role
  • Sports

  • Nadal ousted by Ferrer in Monte Carlo quarters
  • Pacquiao shorts in Bradley fight sold for P1.7M in LA auction
  • Ryu pitches Dodgers past Giants
  • Alonso sets the pace in Chinese GP practice
  • Heat seek Three-peat but Spurs, Pacers top seeds
  • Lifestyle

  • Levine designs womenswear with help from fiancee
  • Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Nobel laureate, dies at 87
  • Ford Mustang turns 50 atop Empire State Building
  • Pro visual artists, lensmen to judge Pagcor’s photo contest
  • ‘Labahita a la bacalao’
  • Entertainment

  • EXO postpones release of mini album ‘Overdose’
  • ‘X-men’ filmmaker slams ‘fabricated’ sex attack claims
  • Singer Chris Brown’s bodyguard on trial in DC
  • Whoopi Goldberg debuts as marijuana columnist
  • ‘X-men’ director accused of sex assault on teen boy
  • Business

  • Italy sells luxury state cars on eBay
  • Asian shares mostly up in quiet trade
  • Dollar up in Asia on US jobs data, Ukraine deal
  • Barbie doll has a problem
  • Oil prices mixed ahead of long Easter weekend
  • Technology

  • Nasa’s moon-orbiting robot crashes down
  • Netizens pay respects to Gabriel Garcia Marquez
  • Nokia recalls 30,000 chargers for Lumia 2520 tablet
  • Facebook rolls out ‘nearby friends’ feature
  • Netizens seethe over Aquino’s ‘sacrifice’ message
  • Opinion

  • Editorial cartoon, April 17, 2014
  • A humbler Church
  • Deepest darkness
  • ‘Agnihotra’ for Earth’s health
  • It’s the Holy Week, time to think of others
  • Global Nation

  • Filipina accomplice arrested for fake bills in Malaysia
  • DoH denies Filipino nurse no longer positive for MERS virus
  • WHO warns vs spread of MERS-Cov, urges vigilance in taking precautions
  • Last call for nominations to ’14 Presidential Awards
  • San Francisco business coalition slams proposed tax on sugary drinks
  • Marketplace
    Advertisement