Confiscation of licenses encourages corruption

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LAST MONTH, a friend was stopped for a traffic violation while driving in Quezon City. As he was in a hurry, he did not make a fuss about it and readily asked for a traffic violation ticket. The traffic enforcer asked for the surrender of his driver’s license. My friend refused, saying that the latest MMDA (Metropolitan Manila Development Authority) rule was for the erring driver to be issued just a violation ticket and settle the fine at any branch of Metrobank within seven days. The traffic enforcer insisted on confiscating his license. Knowing how much of a hassle it would be to redeem his license, my friend was left with no choice but to fork over P500, which the traffic enforcer readily accepted. Whereupon, my friend was allowed to go.

Why is this still happening despite so many decisions churned out by the Supreme Court declaring the confiscation of driver’s license for traffic violations in Metro Manila unlawful? The MMDA continues to sanction such confiscation. This kind of harassment encourages more “kotong cops” to proliferate in our midst.

—GEORGE DEL MAR, Quezon City

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